[Guest Post] Survival of the Easiest

As a veteran Nano and first-time Screnzier, I’ve been thinking a lot about the differences between National Novel Writing Month and Script Frenzy. Mostly, I’ve been thinking about which is easier.

As a seasoned Nanoer, you’d expect me to go with Nanowrimo. After all, I’ve never even written a script before (barring a few five-minute skits I wrote for high school theatre class), while I have roughly half a dozen half-finished novels floating around my bedroom and ideas for at least half a dozen more.  On the Script Frenzy site there’s a forum for Nano-turned-Screnziers, where novelists share the woes of trying to write a script.

Most of these woes have to do with formatting, but I think that’s just silly. Sure, I don’t really know what I’m doing, but that’s what the free version of Celtx is for. Admittedly I still sometimes have questions about how to imbed a flashback in a scene or how to cut away from one room to another room to show simultaneous events, but generally speaking, formatting is pretty easy if you don’t try to do it yourself.

(I did do it myself in class one day when I was handwriting more of my script rather than paying attention to “Death of a Salesman,” but by then I had been using Celtx for a few days and knew what the script should look like. Later that night I brought the paper to Biggby for our write-in, and it made Feliza’s diaphragm contort in hilarity.)

(For those of you who don’t know, that’s the pseudo-scientific way of saying it amused her.)

And then a lot of Nanoers say they have trouble keeping in their head that it’s page-count, not word-count, that matters in Screnzy. To me, that means these people just like doing things the hard way. I mean, come on: 50,000 words (roughly 175 double-spaced pages filled with writing) vs. 100 pages (with lots of space due to formatting). Being the lazy bastard I am, I’ve had no trouble at all thinking in terms of pages instead of words. Consider the difference, here. If you write five words during Nano, you look like this:

Whereas if you write five pages during Screnzy, you look more like this…

Remember: Pages > words.

The only real problem I’m having with Screnzy is the writing itself. The reason being that when I write a novel, I usually have at least most of the scenes and dialogue planned out. Not in a wrote-a-detailed-outline way, but in a daydreamed-about-it-in-my-head way. I visualize while doing the dishes at work or driving. But with this script, I have done very little visualizing, which is probably a bad thing since scripts are extremely visual. So I keep getting stuck because, although I know what’s happening, I don’t know how it’s happening – I don’t have a clear idea of what the setting looks like, how the characters are interacting, or what the characters are saying. But I think that’s a personal problem.

As of Day 10 I should be on page 33.3 (if my math is wrong I’ll use the excuse that all good English teachers use: I don’t teach math), but without any script-writing yet done today I’m on page 40. This is my deciding factor on whether Screnzy or Nano is easier: I am NEVER ahead on Nano. In fact, though I won Nano 2011, I spent most of November behind. I had days when I had to force myself to write at least 2500 words just so I could be almost caught up.

Whereas during Screnzy, most of my tweets are like this one:

I rest my case.

Elizabeth Anderson is an education major at the University of Toledo, specializing in language arts and sciences.  She is a two-time Nanowrimo participant, a first-year Screnzier.  In her spare time she likes to read, write, draw, sing, play piano, take walks, garden, and be generally weird and nerdy.  Check out her blog, Twitter, or Facebook page.

[Guest Post] Writing for Graphic Novels

I had the feeling that it would be easier to achieve the minimum of 100 pages for Script Frenzy than the 50.000 words for last year’s NaNoWriMo and till now that seems to be the case, even being my first time writing a script and not having written much on the second week.

It was a bit tough deciding what to do, the novelty of it and the many possibilities making me euphoric (a videogame? A comic? Oh, how about radio plays?) but I ended up choosing to script a story that I had on my mind for a while in graphic novel format.

Usually, before I draw the final comic or graphic novel pages I make thumbnails of them first with the dialogue for each panel and notes scribbled on the margins, so adding scripting before all that was a new approach to me.

I started piecing the outline together and developing the characters around a month before the event started. I was pretty excited to try something new and developing a (sort of) new story, especially after the fun I had last year with NaNo. Having a lot of free time then helped the want of doing something, of being productive and work on personal projects.

In the first couple of days, still struggling with the new writing format, I was a bit too focused on how the layout of the page would look in the end which made me slow (I was indecisive and second-guessing it a lot) but slowly I started to try to just keep the number of panels per page in check and not be so perfectionist about where exactly they would go. I realized it was more important for me to spare most of the effort for the flow of the story right now. Layout problems can be solved later (or so I hope), even if some tweaking is needed. Still, I have to constantly remind myself to write first and edit later.

Each panel description was either a pain or an enjoyment. I have a pretty strong visual for some of the panels so describing them exactly the way I want them makes my mind at ease. However when I don’t have a specific image my vague and/or short descriptions leave me feeling that my script is lacking. Then again, not all panels will be all action packed right? I don’t think it’s a bad thing, even if the feeling doesn’t quite leave me be.

On the first week the story I’ve been keeping only on my mind just ran with abandon, filling pages and pages of interactions and angles and expression, but then assignments sucked my time and energy and I felt inertia starting to creep. The second week was spent trying to keep up, finding a couple of minutes to write a page, seeing the goal of 100 pages by the 22nd to get a 100 euro donation to OLL start to circle the drain. I was afraid my descent from run to crawl would end on a full stop. And that’s why this weekend I’m metaphorically glued to my office chair unless the house is on fire.

Tomás is a Visual Arts student aiming for Concept Art. He draws, writes, plays games and turns junk into other stuff among other things. You can see some of his works at tomsp.tumblr.com.

[Script Frenzy] Press Select: A first-person tutorial about game writing

“Press Select”

MENU
“New Game”
“Continue” [Appears conditionally on previous save]
“Credits”
“Quit”

NEW GAME

The camera is behind the player-character’s closed eyes, slowly flickering open in a very cliche, minimalist white room. As soon as the player-character’s eyes are fully open, he can navigate the 3D environment with ease. The painfully shiny, circular room is empty, devoid of windows and doors.

CHEERY AUTOMATED MALE
(o.s.)
Welcome to your mind, player-character. As you can see, it is a bit of a blank slate right now. But you are here right now because you want to write a video game script. My name is Alex. My function is to get you started on the basics. First, let’s talk about formatting.

[SFX: PRINTING PAPER]
A black slot appears in the wall and promptly vomits a gray sheet of PAPER, light but contrasting significantly with the whiteness of the perfect room.

When the player picks up the PAPER:
[DIALOGUE BOX]
Resources” checklist added to inventory [viewable in Pause menu].

CHEERY AUTOMATED MALE
Take a look at your resources list to get started on any formatting questions you might have. As far as I am aware, there exists no “one” industry standard for game formatting–it all comes back to the game itself that you are writing. First, what kind of game would you like to make?

[DIALOGUE BOX]
[1.1] I will create the next Bejeweled.
[1.2] I will create the next Fallout.
[1.3] I will create… honestly, I have no idea.

[1.1]
CHEERY AUTOMATED MALE
(o.s.)
So you envy Rovio then. Try to focus on quality, however, over quantity. Your game may or may not have a storyline, but it won’t cost you an arm and a leg to write it. It certainly won’t occupy a hundred pages if you’re planning this project for Script Frenzy. Still, it needs words. It needs a script, or at least a storyboard. Every action has a consequence.

BRANCH CHAPTER
[SFX: CRACKING TILE]
The center of the floor in the room cracks, a sapling of a tree abruptly springing from it. Pink cherry blossoms float to the ground.
IF the player is standing directly over the crack, he will be thrust to the ground. [-10 HP]

CHEERY AUTOMATED MALE
(o.s.)
Branching will become your best friend or your worst enemy.

The player-character, examining the tree, sees that each of the branches bears a glowing label, “Touch Me,” upon approach.

IF the player-character touches the BRANCH, two more BRANCHES spring forth, each with the same label and exponential growing ability.

When the player has activated any six branches:
CHEERY AUTOMATED MALE
Accounting for every possible action the player could take is a hassle, admittedly. But it is worth it.
[Go to Conclusion]

[1.2]
CHEERY AUTOMATED MALE
(o.s.)
Did you know that the video game scripts for games like Bioshock and Mass Effect consist of thousands of pages, not including character bibles and world encyclopedias? Furthermore, consider that good games do not entirely rely on convenient cutscenes to make a complete story–even the classic JRPGs contain story elements in the fights and missions between movie-like, cinematic sequences, even if it just means interacting with a shopkeeper. Cutscenes are the solution of a screenwriter forced to work on a video game. The best way to write a game is as a gamer.

[Go to Branch Chapter]

[1.3]
CHEERY AUTOMATED MALE
(o.s.)
Do not concern yourself with details too much. Your mind is not empty–it is only clear. Do not worry at this time about what kind of mechanics you have, or what kind of graphics you want in the final product. Write plot, first. Write characters, first. Write your ideas like a chapter of a novel, or a short story.

[Go to Conclusion]

CONCLUSION
A section of paneling from the wall becomes a DOOR, moving out and sliding up. Outside, an exotic, barren, and beautiful landscape of rocks and trees appears. The sky is dark with night, but stars and some kind of planetary body cast a romantic glow on the landscape, illuminating it.

Another section of paneling slides out and up. CHEERY AUTOMATED MALE enters, carrying a Chromebook under his arm and making a beeline for the door. He stops at its entrance to face the player-character.

CHEERY AUTOMATED MALE
Let’s start imagining.

Alex J. Freemont is a self-nominated android fascinated by the humanizing appeal of good stories wherever they can be found, especially if they involve time-travelling British men. It muses about the geek life on Twitter, while on transcending pixels it picks apart the aesthetics of genius casual games.

[Script Frenzy] ‘Half-Sized’ Soundtrack

When I write, I like to listen to music.  I made at least two different playlists when I wrote The TECH Project, and the one I’m using while writing and editing The Final Experiment is still flexible.  I even made one as I wrote Victorious for NaNoWriMo 2011 – but it ended up only four songs long.

This year, I planned Script Frenzy out a bit more than I have in previous years, and that includes the playlist.

I’ve got a nice playlist started that’s composed of what I’d consider “throwbacks”: songs I remember from my junior high and high school years that capture the tone of what I want Half-Sized Tiger to be.

Some of the songs aren’t from those years – most remarkably the one ADELE song on the list – but they’ve all got the tone I’m trying to achieve in Half-Sized Tiger.  I also included some links to YouTube videos – official videos by the artists, fan videos using footage from Toradora!, and non-official fan videos as well.

And so, without further ado:

  1. Everybody (Backstreet’s Back) – Backstreet Boys
  2. Dance with the Devil – Breaking Benjamin
  3. Set Fire to the Rain – ADELE
  4. How to Save A Life – The Fray
  5. Up Against a Wall – Boys Like Girls
  6. Fall Back Into My Life – Amber Pacific
  7. I Want it That Way – Backstreet Boys
  8. Dance Inside – The All-American Rejects
  9. Unwanted – Avril Lavigne
  10. Sweetness – Jimmy Eat World
  11. Mr. Brightside – The Killers
  12. Until The End – Breaking Benjamin
  13. Hanging By a Moment – Lifehouse
  14. My Immortal (Radio Edit) – Evanescence
  15. Incomplete – Backstreet Boys
  16. I’ll Be There For You – Jon Bon Jovi
  17. Fall For You – Secondhand Serenade
  18. Teenage Dream – Boyce Avenue

That’s quite the mix, isn’t it?  I don’t think anyone besides be would stick a Backstreet Boys song in front of a Breaking Benjamin song, but that’s what it is.  This list is subject to order changes as I change or tweak the order of events in the screenplay, but this is more or less the inspiration I’m drawing from this month.

Do you prefer listening to music when you write?  Do you have a Script Frenzy playlist?  If so, blog about it and post the link in the comments.  If you listen to a particular album, let me know – I’m always on the lookout for new music, and I’d love to hear what inspires you.

[Guest Post] Double Challenge

Cliff Garstka, Sr.This year I decided to try my hand in the Script Frenzy “script writing competition”. Granted, all you need to do is to write 100 pages to win, so everyone can potentially win. Now, I have won writing competitions in the past that actually required “content” to win, so this is a no brainer, right? Well, my wife and friends often tell me I have no brains, so this should be a perfect fit.

Although I can write at the drop of a hat, I absolutely HATED all my English classes in school. On top of that, I can’t spell worth a lick. Thank God for Spell Check and an understanding wife who is a wiz at spelling!

Those who know me know I don’t take the easy road in any adventure. And I am not taking one in this year’s Script Frenzy. What adventure am I throwing myself into? Glad you asked.

I was watching the news a couple of weeks ago, something I rarely do now-a-days, when something caught my eye. Immediately a story began festering in my mind, a what if story. The story took on a life of its own. I couldn’t rid my mind of the possibilities for the story. I contacted an author friend of mine and bounced the idea off of him. HE LOVED IT!

Great. I now had a concept for my story, and I figured, why not write this script for the contest?  I started an outline for the story, and forwarded it to my friend. Again, he loved the concept. He pointed out a few potential holes that needed filling, but encouraged me nonetheless. As the plot thickened, something strange happened. I would refine my outline, and define the “Plot Points”, and then I would hear that the twist I was planning actually happened in real life! Not once, but almost daily.

My friend would send me something that he heard and/or read about, and was as amazed as I was. Because of the timeliness, he encouraged me to not only write my script, but to also write a novel. At first I said “no way,” I can’t write a novel, especially when I am preparing to write a 100-plus page script. But as the outline grew, and my note cards multiplied, I realized there is a novel contained in my story.

My story is called “ANATEDAE PLUMP.” It’s an Action/Thriller, set in the present-day Middle East. Just so you know, although I will be writing both simultaneously, I am focusing on my script first and foremost. I will get as much of the novel written in April as I can, but I will complete 100 plus pages of the script. You can keep up with how I am doing by following me either on Script Frenzy or my web site, www.FrugalProductions.info.

Now to matters at hand. I also submitted a spec script to another author to adapt his novel to a script, and offered to adapt another story for another friend of mine. I told you I liked a challenge. As I usually sign off on my writings, keep your ink wet, and your sleeves dry. Till next time, happy reading.

Cliff Garstka, Sr. is an imdb.com accredited actor, writer, director and producer. He recently created Frugal Productions to make his films the way he wants them made – and Frugal Productions is open to assist other independent filmmakers. Their first film, “FROM THE EARTH,” was accepted into the 2011 Santa Fe Independent Film Festival. You can check them out online at www.FrugalProductions.info or email Cliff at Cliff@FrugalProductions.info.