13 Young Adult Horror Novels for next month

This young adult horror list went up at Unbound Worlds over the summer, but it’s a perfect list to get you started on your Halloween reads.

Who doesn’t love a good scary story? Young adult fiction is full of horror, and not just of the embarrassing-nightmare variety. From ghosts and demons in possession of homes to serial killers making their rounds through schools and parties, here are thirteen terrifying books to introduce you to young adult horror – and maybe even keep you awake at night.

Check it out now over at Unbound Worlds.

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For the love of all that’s holy, PLEASE read Natalie C. Parker’s SEAFIRE

My first piece for Tor.com (!!!) is a review of what’s possibly my favorite release of the summer: Natalie C. Parker’s Seafire, which came out yesterday from Razorbill.

Caledonia Styx’s ship, the Mors Navis, is one of the only ships that still sails free from the rule of bloodthirsty warlord Aric Athair and his army of Bullets, who brutalize the coastal settlements and seabound communities alike. The Bullets are not to be trusted: after all, it was a Bullet boy claiming to seek a place on the Mors Navis who talked Caledonia into revealing the Mors Navis’s location, resulting in the death of every person in the crew save Caledonia and her best friend, Pisces, who were ashore on a supply run.

Four years later, Caledonia and Pisces have rebuilt the Mors Navis and recruited a new crew entirely made up of women and girls who have lost their own families and homes to Athair’s raids. The women of the Mors Navis are determined to chip away at Athair’s empire, even if that means taking his navy down ship by ship. But when Pisces brings aboard a runaway Bullet who says he wants to defect, the secret Caledonia’s been keeping for four years threatens to come to light, reopening old wounds and endangering the new family she and Pisces have built.

Seafire is a book I’ve been describing to my friend as “If a magical girl anime was actually about pirates,” which translates to “Possibly a book written with my express loves in mind.”

You can read the full and less fangirly review at Tor.com.

Yes, I can list my favorite Killer Schoolgirls, can’t you?

In the category of “Weird pitches I write to my editor at Unbound Worlds that somehow make it to see the light of day”: seventeen killer schoolgirls (or killer FORMER schoolgirls) guaranteed to liven up your TBR pile.

And I managed to fit one of my favorites, too:

In alternate-history Japan, the authoritarian government forces classes of middle school third-years (equivalent to U.S. freshmen in high school) to participate in a bloody fight to the death. This time around, one of the most deadly participants is Mitsuko, a popular and cold-hearted girl whose desire to survive outweighs just about every single one of her classmates. And, as readers find out, her first victim in the battle royale isn’t the first person she’s killed.

Check out the other 16 Murder Friends in my list over at Unbound Worlds!

Dimple Shah is the YA Heroine I needed 10 years ago

My first piece for Book Riot talks about my favorite YA novel of 2017: When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon.

When the reader meets Dimple at the start of the story, she’s over the moon about her acceptance to Stanford and eager to escape the pressure from her family and community to land an ideal husband. She has ambitions, and those ambitions matter to her much more than satisfying other people’s desire for her to get married.

I read the book in one sitting, and I couldn’t stop thinking about it, and eventually I was forced to admit to myself that I wished I had a book like this when I was in high school.

I loved this book so much for so many reasons, and I’m really looking forward to Menon’s next book, From Twinkle, With Love. There are a few other things I didn’t mention in this article for Book Riot — like the fact that I identify with Rishi far more than I identify with Dimple. (There’s a point at which people refuse to pronounce his name right, even after being corrected, which is an ongoing life struggle on this end.)

But I digress.

This was the first of my pieces for Book Riot, and I’m pretty excited about it! Head over to the article now and let me know what you think in the comments.

Read 52 books in 2018 with this reading challenge

Do you set a reading goal during the new year? I’ve done the 100 Books Challenge every year since 2012 (although for 2018, I’m increasing that to 120 books), and I know a lot of others set goals for the year as well.

But without some prompts or suggestions, it can be hard to decide which ones to go for. With that in mind, here’s a reading challenge with some suggested titles to help you get through 52 books this year. (And since many of these are part of a series, you might even get through a lot more by reading the rest!)

Several books on the list are part of a series, so if you’re aiming even higher than a book a week (like I am), pick up the rest of the series to flesh out your list!

You can find the full challenge at Unbound Worlds.

I’m reading even MORE books in 2018

I finished 2017 with 127 books, far above my goal of 100! So, since I really doubt I’ll be reading FEWER books this year based on my current workload, I decided to make it my goal to read 10 books per month for a total of 120 Books in 2018.

For January, I have a few titles planned to read:

  1. Saga, Vol. 1 (Amalgam Book Club)
  2. Breath of Earth by Beth Cato (Girls in Capes Book Club)
  3. Death’s End by Cixin Liu
  4. Blood Rose Rebellion by Rosalyn Eves
  5. Devil is a Part-Timer! by Satoshi Wagahara
  6. So I’m a Spider, So What? Vol. 1 [manga]
  7. Magical Girl Raising Project, Vol. 1 [manga]
  8. Puella Magi Homura Tamura, Vol. 2
  9. Horimiya, Vol. 9
  10. Puella Magi Oriko Magica: Sadness Prayer, Vol. 3

What are you planning to read in January?

Keladry of Mindelan prepared me to be a woman in 2017

I swear, I really am capable of writing about topics other than Protector of the Small (despite recent evidence to the contrary), but the series is far more timely than I wish it were.

I was only twelve or so when I read the book for the first time. This is a little ridiculous, I thought to myself when I read it, and again a year or so later when I read the scene in the conclusion to the quartet when a man displeased with Kel’s command style implies she’s a whoreGrown adults can’t possibly act like that. It’s almost as cartoonish as when the coyote in Looney Toons doesn’t fall right away when he walks off a cliff.

Twelve-year-old me has eaten those words for breakfast after the evolution of the social internet. And as an adult, I’ve reflected on these books far more often than I wish I needed to when encountering men who think I’m unable to do a job because of my gender.

You can read the full essay, including me comparing Senator Gillebrand to the eponymous Protector of the Small, at Unbound Worlds.