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Some of the coolest women in SF/F are moms

My newest at The Portalist lists 8 of my favorite moms of speculative fiction:

These women come in many forms, from the women who raised us to the teachers and role models we’ve found in the world around us—even in fiction.

While I couldn’t possibly fit them all on one list, here are eight genre fiction mother figures I’m grateful for this Mother’s Day.

Find out who else (besides The General) is on the list, and tell me about some of YOUR favorite moms in sci-fi.

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My review of The Stars Are Legion is live now at Girls in Capes

I’m excited to share my newest review, which is live now at Girls in Capes:

Legion is a wonderful book, and I did enjoy it for the way it made me think about the world, but it’s not a book to read if you’re looking specifically for better and more diverse types of romances. If you’re not super interested in happy romances, this would be a perfectly fine book for you, but if any book epitomizes our Toxic Romance theme for this month, this one is it.

As a warning, The Stars Are Legion contains many references and depictions of physical, mental, and emotional abuse, and there’s also cannibalism and some other kinda squicky bits. Anyway, I discuss it further in my review — you can check that out now.

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Read my review of K.B. Wagers’ BEHIND THE THRONE on Girls in Capes

B-T-7-darkerCheck out my review of BEHIND THE THRONE in Girls in Capes!

I also love the way that the book addresses not only who she is as a gunrunner (basically a glorified space pirate), but who she is as the heiress to the empire and as a woman. Her heart is broken over her loved ones who have been killed; she’ll never live up to her mother’s expectations or her sister’s legacy; she worries about fulfilling her duties not just to the throne, but her people.

Behind the Throne is a debut adult science fiction set in the heart of space. 5 out of 5 stars!

Flash Review, Issue #005

Here are a few short reviews of books I’ve read in the past month.

The Screaming Divas by Suzanne Kamata

Provided by the publisher for review. Find Suzanne’s interview at Girls in Capes.

When I started this book, I was expecting something more along the lines of a book about a band, with a lot of practicing and concerts, but the book ended up reading more like The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants except with a punk band instead of magic jeans.

Originally, I’d set this book aside because the first chapter didn’t hook me, but I’m glad I ended up following through, because as it turns out, the character (Trudy) whose point of view is shown in the first chapter is the least interesting and relatable.  I enjoyed each of the other three girls’ plotlines, especially Esther’s, and I found some of my own life experiences reflected in Harumi.  Cassie was my favorite of the girls, though I didn’t quite like the progression of her plot.

The Screaming Divas was a fascinating read after that initial bump, but the strange change of pace towards the end and the overall plot wasn’t really for me.  However, the book has fascinating diversity and represents each character in what I find to be a very fair way.

3 out of 5 stars

Kindred by Octavia Butler

Purchased for the Girls in Capes book club.

Octavia Butler’s been on my list a long time, and KINDRED was an incredible introduction to this prolific science fiction author.  Following a woman as she gets yanked back and forth in time between the present day (1976) and the antebellum South, the novel is harsh and emotionally difficult in the best kind of way.

Its emotional difficulty will turn many readers off, but this book is an important one to read, especially for those interested in history.  Despite its genre, KINDRED is an obviously well-researched and deeply thoughtful read.

5 out of 5 stars

My most anticipated Fall 2014/Winter 2015 continuing series (Orbit Books)

One of my favorite publishers is Orbit Books.  That’s kind of a difficult thing to say, since there are tons of publishers that put out books I adore — Firebird, Penguin’s SPEAK imprint, Quirk Books, Dark Horse, and First Second all come to mind – but most books I’ve read from Orbit US have been right up my alley — this year alone, there was the conclusion of Rachel Bach’s Paradox trilogy and M. R. Carey’s The Girl with All the Gifts.

Most of the books from Orbit are ones I review for Girls in Capes, but not all of them are right for the site, so my reviews don’t always get posted there.  However, there are quite a few titles due out this year that I’m really looking forward to checking out.

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