Find out what I recommend in Adult Sci-Fi & Fantasy in Summer 2016

My newest piece on Girls in Capes is a recommendation list of this summer’s most anticipated adult science fiction and fantasy for GiC readers.

I have a notoriously tall To Be Read pile. If you look at my Goodreads account, you’ll see that I consistently have 10 or more books shelved in Currently Reading, and right now my To Read list is almost at 500!

…but that doesn’t mean I don’t always have an eye out for even more books to read, especially ones from authors I’m really excited about. Here are a few of my most anticipated new releases for Summer 2016, in order of their release date.

Just between you and me, I have two books that I’m most excited to share — the launch of a new series and a continuation, with one firmly a science fiction space opera and the other an apocalyptic fantasy.

But hey, I won’t spoil the surprise: you’ll find my reviews for K.B. Wagers’ Behind the Throne and N.K. Jemisin’s The Obelisk Gate on Girls in Capes later this summer.

Banned Books Week 2011: Name Your Poison

Banned Books Week, an observation held each year by the American Library Association, starts today and lasts through October 1, the end of this week, to raise awareness of books that are currently or have been banned from schools, libraries, and more simply because they were controversial.

Some books that have been banned include J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, perhaps most famously; classic novels such as J. D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye and John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men; and children’s stories such as Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time and Dav Pikley’s Captain Underpants series.

These books have been challenged by parents and community members for many reasons, from offenses to religious beliefs to the idea that children and teens shouldn’t be exposed to the ideas inside the books.

Are these reasons appropriate?  I say no.

Books exist to help people expand their horizons past what they normally experience, and by banning books from children and teens, these horizons are held in stasis.

This year for Banned Books Week, please take some time to visit the ALA’s page on Banned Books.  Pick one out of the list – maybe one that’s already in your library – and read it, share it, and talk about it with your friends and family members.  If you have children, read one of the books on the list to them and talk to them about it.

Closing books closes out ideas.  Keep ideas alive this year by opening a book and giving it the good old once-over.

What Banned Book are you reading this week?  I’ll be reading Margaret Atwood’s post-apocalyptic novel A Handmaid’s Tale.